Menopause quiz : mean age

Menopause quiz : mean age

Menopause as we have seen before usually occurs between the ages of 45 and 55.

More specifically, several studies from countries around the globe have shown that the overall mean age is 48.8 years1.

But this average age varies according to geography1.

Would you try and match each mean age with its geographical area?

You might find some results rather surprising …

1: Dunneram Y, Greenwood DC, Cade JE. Diet, menopause and the risk of ovarian, endometrial and breast cancer. Proc Nutr Soc. 2019 Aug;78(3):438-448. doi: 10.1017/S0029665118002884. Epub 2019 Feb 1. PMID: 30706844.

Are you interested in the experiences of women at different stages of their menopause? Would you like a reminder of the physiology of menopause and the main symptoms? Download our free ebook, Menopause Story(ies).

Ménopause quiz : âge moyen

Ménopause quiz : âge moyen

La ménopause on l’a vu survient généralement entre 45 et 55 ans.

Plus pécisément, plusieurs études à travers le monde ont montré que l’âge moyen était globalement de 48,8 ans1.

Mais cet âge moyen varie selon les géographies1.

Sauriez-vous associer chaque âge moyen à sa zone géographique?

Vous pourriez trouver certains résultats plutôt surprenants …

Vous êtes intéressée par l’expérience vécue par des femmes à des stades différents de leur ménopause? Souhaitez un rappel de la physiologie de la ménopause et des principaux symptômes ? Téléchargez notre ebook gratuit, Histoire(s) de ménopause.

1: Dunneram Y, Greenwood DC, Cade JE. Diet, menopause and the risk of ovarian, endometrial and breast cancer. Proc Nutr Soc. 2019 Aug;78(3):438-448. doi: 10.1017/S0029665118002884. Epub 2019 Feb 1. PMID: 30706844.

Menopause: let’s not run away from (good) fat – part two

Menopause: let’s not run away from (good) fat – part two

In the part one we saw that the temptation to avoid fat at all costs to fight against weight gain during menopause could prove to be counter-beneficial.
It’s all a question of quantity and quality.

We’ve already discussed « quantity », let us now dive into the « quality » aspect.

You may have had the opportunity to watch this epic spaghetti western by Sergio Leone, « The Good, the Bad and the Ugly ».
In terms of « quality », we could say that the different types of fat are similar to the cast of this cult movie.

Staring as the BadTrans fats.

They are the « bad guys » in the movie. Studies agree that they seriously increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

They’re also suspected of increasing insulin resistance (which is really bad for your waistline…and, even worse, a risk factor for type 2 diabetes).
You’ll find them naturally occurring in small amounts in red meat (beef, lamb) or dairy. And it seems that small amounts won’t do you any harm.
The problem is that man-made trans fats (aka partially hydrogenated fats) are a huge food industry favorite because of their stability (they don’t become rancid, they can withstand repeated heating without breaking down). You’ll therefore find them everywhere: from process foods (margarine, cookies, …) to cooking/frying oil in restaurants (and not just fast food ones).

The recommendation is that in total the trans fats consumed daily do not exceed 2% of the total energy intake (1.5% for industrial trans fats1).

Since mid-2018, industrial trans fats have been officially banned in food products for sale to the public and in restaurants in the United States.
And within the European Union, from April 2, 2021, industrial trans fats must not exceed 2 g per 100 g of fat in food products intended for the final consummer2.

In any case, monitoring labels very closely is essential.

Staring as the UglySaturated fats.

You’ll find them in meat (especially red meat), cheese, cream, butter, eggs, coconut oil, palm oil…

For a long time they were considered harmful, associating them with bad cholesterol and cardiovascular disease. However, recent studies have questioned this association, believing that there is a lack of evidence to definitively conclude that saturated fats systematically increase cardiovascular risks.
Different types of saturated fats would have different impacts on health, and avoiding all foods high in saturated fatty acids would not be the solution
For instance dark chocolate, rich in saturated fats, not only would not increase cardiovascular risks but would offer beneficial effects in terms of prevention of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes3.
On the other hand, studies agree that palm oil, which is also rich in saturated fats (around 50%), seems to increase cardiovascular risks.

In any case, caution remains in order and it is recommended to limit the consumption of saturated fats to less than 10% of the total daily calories intake.

Finally, in the role of the Good: Unsaturated fats.

Like all “good” heroes, they are complex characters. They can be monounsaturated  or they can be polyunsaturated. Both are beneficial for your health; for instance, they can both help reduce risks of cardiovascular diseases.

Monounsaturated fats can help provide the antioxidant vitamin E we need. Polyunsaturated fats will bring the essential fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6) we can’t properly function without.

You’ll find unsaturated fats in avocados, plant-based oils, seeds, nuts; but also in wild game or fish.

They often coexist one with each other in the same food. Take rapeseed oil  for example: it consists of 60% monounsaturated fats and 27% polyunsaturated fats.

Let’s dwell for a moment on polyunsaturated essential fatty acids.
They are essential because they cannot be synthesized by your body, they have to come from your diet.
To be more accurate, the parent compounds (linoleic acid (LA), an omega-6 and α-linoleic acid (ALA), an omega-3) cannot be synthesized. However those parents can “give birth” to longer chains of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, like docosahexaenoic acid or DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid critical for your cell membranes.
The issue is that the capacity to convert ALA into DHA is pretty low.
Granted it’s higher in women (9% conversion rate) than in men (0-4%), but the bad news for postmenopausal women is that it seems to be an effect of oestrogen hormone level.
So, what it means is that you have to treat DHA like an essential nutrient and get it from your food. And the best source is fish, fatty fish.
Seeds and ALA packed vegetable oils are not to be discarded, not at all, but they won’t bring you enough of DHA your body needs.
A last few words about omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids: omega-6 fatty acids are inflammatory and omega-3 ones are anti-inflammatory. So getting the right omega-6/omega-3 ratio seems important to keep some diseases at bay .
Our modern diet often has a ratio that is much too high (15:1 or even higher). There seems to be no definitive answer as to what the optimal ratio is (it seems to depend on what your health condition is) but most recommendations talk about a ratio kept between 1:1 and 4:14.

This concludes our overview of the different types of fat. As we have seen, well chosen and in the right amounts, fat can be a (another) good ally for postmenopausal women.

Are you interested in the experiences of women at different stages of their menopause? Would you like a reminder of the physiology of menopause and the main symptoms? Download our free ebook, Menopause Story(ies).

1: source anses.fr
2: source Official Journal of the European Union – COMMISSION REGULATION (EU) 2019/649 of 24 April 2019
3: source Saturated Fats and Health: A Reassessment and Proposal for Food-Based Recommendations: JACC State-of-the-Art Review. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2020 Aug 18;
doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2020.05.077.
4: source The importance of the ratio of omega-6/omega-3 essential fatty acids. Biomed Pharmacother. 2002 Oct;56(8):365-79. doi: 10.1016/s0753-3322(02)00253-6.

Ménopause : ne fuyons pas le (bon) gras – deuxième partie

Ménopause : ne fuyons pas le (bon) gras – deuxième partie

Dans la première partie nous avons vu que la tentation d’éviter à tout prix les matières grasses pour lutter contre la prise de poids à la ménopause pouvait s’avérer contre-bénéfique.
Tout est une question de quantité et de qualité.

Après avoir parlé « quantité », détaillons l’aspect « qualité ».

Vous avez peut-être eu l’occasion de regarder cet épique western spaghetti de Sergio Leone, « Le bon, la brute et le truand ».
En terme de « qualité », on pourrait dire que les différents types de matières grasses s’apparentent au casting de ce film culte.

Dans le rôle de la brute: les acides gras trans .

Ce sont les « méchants » du film. Il y a consensus sur le fait qu’ils augmentent sérieusement les risques de maladies cardiovasculaires.

On les soupçonne également d’augmenter la résistance à l’insuline (très mauvais pour le tour de taille…et, pire encore, un vrai facteur de risque dans le déclenchement du diabète de type 2).
Vous les trouvez naturellement en petites quantités dans la viande rouge (bœuf, agneau, …) ou les produits laitiers. Et il semble qu’en petites quantités ils ne présentent pas de risque.
Le problème est que les acides gras trans industriels (obtenus par hydrogénation d’huiles végétales) sont un grand favori de l’industrie agroalimentaire en raison de leur stabilité (ils ne rancissent pas, peuvent supporter des hautes températures de cuisson (à répétition)).
On les retrouve donc partout : des pâtisseries et biscuits industriels aux margarines mais aussi comme huile de friture ou cuisson dans les restaurants (et pas juste les fast foods).

La recommandation est que le total des acides gras trans consommés ne dépasse pas 2% de l’apport énergétique total journalier (1,5% pour les acides gras trans industriels1).

Depuis mi-2018 les acides gras trans industriels sont officiellement interdits dans les produits alimentaires en vente dans le commerce et dans la restauration aux Etats-Unis.
Et au sein de l’Union européenne, à partir du 2 avril 2021 les acides gras trans industriels ne devront pas dépasser 2 g pour 100 g de matières grasses dans les produits alimentaires destinés au consommateur final et à la vente au détail2.

En tout état de cause, surveiller de très près les étiquettes est essentiel.

Dans le rôle du truand: les acides gras saturés.

On les retrouve dans la viande (surtout la viande rouge), le fromage, la crème fraîche, le beurre, les œufs, l’huile de coco, l’huile de palme …

Pendant longtemps on les a considérés comme néfastes, les associant au mauvais cholestérol et aux maladies cardiovasculaires. Des études récentes ont cependant remis en cause cette association, estimant qu’il y avait un manque de preuves permettant de conclure de façon définitive que les acides gras saturés augmenteraient systématiquement les risques cardiovasculaires.
Les différents types d’acides gras saturés auraient des impacts différents sur la santé, et fuir tous les aliments riches en acides gras saturés ne serait pas la solution.
Ainsi le chocolat noir, riche an acides gras saturés, non seulement n’augmenterait pas les risques cardiovasculaires mais offrirait des effets bénéfiques en terme de prévention de risques cardiovasculaires et de diabète de type 23.
D’un autre côté les études s’accordent pour dire que l’huile de palme, elle aussi riche en acides gras saturés (environ 50%), semble augmenter les risques cardiovasculaires.

Quoi qu’il en soit, la prudence reste de mise et il est recommandé de limiter la consommation d’acides gras saturés à moins de 10% de l’apport énergétique total journalier.

Enfin dans le rôle du bon: les acides gras insaturés.

Comme tous les héros « positifs », ce sont des personnages complexes. Ils peuvent être monoinsaturés ou bien polyinsaturés. Qu’ils soient l’un ou l’autre, ils présentent de grands bénéfices pour la santé, comme réduire les risques cardiovasculaires.

Les acides gras monoinsaturés peuvent aider à apporter la vitamine E antioxydante dont le corps a besoin.
Les acides gras polyinsaturés eux comprennent les acides gras essentiels (oméga 3 et oméga 6) dont le corps ne peut se passer pour bien fonctionner.

On trouve les acides gras insaturés dans les avocats, huiles végétales, les graines, les noix…mais aussi dans le gibier ou le poisson.

Ils cohabitent souvent dans un même aliment. Par exemple l’huile de colza : on y trouve 60% d’acides gras monoinsaturés et 27% d’acides gras polyinsaturés.

Arrêtons nous un instant sur les acides gras essentiels polyinsaturés.
Ils sont essentiels parce qu’ils ne peuvent pas être synthétisés par l’organisme et doivent donc absolument être fournis par l’alimentation.
Plus pécisément, les éléments de base (acide linoléique, un oméga-6 et acide α-linoléique, un oméga-3) ne peuvent pas être synthétisés. Cependant ces éléments de base peuvent être convertis en omégas-3 et omégas-6 de chaînes atomiques plus longues, comme l’acide docosahexaénoïque ou DHA, un oméga-3 critique pour la membrane cellulaire.
Le problème est que le taux de conversion de l’acide α-linoléique en DHA est vraiment bas.
Certes, il est plus élevé chez les femmes que chez les hommes (9% contre 0-4%), mais la mauvaise nouvelle pour la femme ménopausée est que cela semble être lié à la présence des oestrogènes dans l’organisme.
Cela signifie donc qu’il faut traiter le DHA comme un nutriment essentiel et l’obtenir via l’alimentation. Et la meilleure source de DHA est le poisson, de fait le poisson gras.
Les graines et les huiles végétales bourrées d’acide α-linoléique ne sont pas à négliger, au contraire, mais elles ne vous apporteront pas le DHA dont votre organisme a besoin, en tout cas pas en quantité suffisante.
Un dernier mot sur les omégas-3 et les omégas-6: les omégas-6 ont des propriétés inflammatoires et les omégas-3 anti-inflammatoires. Avoir un bon ratio entre les deux semble donc essentiel pour éviter certaines maladies.
Nos régimes alimentaires modernes ont souvent un ratio oméga-6/oméga-3 beaucoup trop élevé (15 :1 voire au-delà). Il n’y a pas consensus sur LE ratio idéal  (il semble dépendre de l’état de santé de la personne concernée) mais la plupart des recommandations publiées parlent d’un ratio compris entre 1 :1 et 4 :14.

Ainsi s’achève notre tour d’horizon des différents types de gras. Comme nous avons pu le constater, bien choisies, et dans les bonnes quantités, les matières grasses peuvent être un (autre) bon allié pour les femmes ménopausées.

Vous êtes intéressée par l’expérience vécue par des femmes à des stades différents de leur ménopause? Souhaitez un rappel de la physiologie de la ménopause et des principaux symptômes ? Téléchargez notre ebook gratuit, Histoire(s) de ménopause.

1: source anses.fr
2: source Journal officiel de l’Union européenne – RÈGLEMENT (UE) 2019/649 DE LA COMMISSION du 24 avril 2019
3: source Saturated Fats and Health: A Reassessment and Proposal for Food-Based Recommendations: JACC State-of-the-Art Review. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2020 Aug 18;
doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2020.05.077.
4: source The importance of the ratio of omega-6/omega-3 essential fatty acids. Biomed Pharmacother. 2002 Oct;56(8):365-79. doi: 10.1016/s0753-3322(02)00253-6.

Menopause: let’s not run away from (good) fat – part one

Menopause: let’s not run away from (good) fat – part one

The vast majority of women consider menopause to be accompanied by weight gain.

And indeed, most scientific studies have found an increase in weight in postmenopausal women (some studies speak of an increase of 0.5 kg per year1), although there is debate on the real impact of menopause as such vs. slowing metabolism with age.

In any case, one of the consequences of this perception is the temptation to « flee » from fat in all its forms, or at least to greatly limit its consumption.

But this almost instinctive temptation makes the menopausal woman miss the undeniable benefits of a « reasonable » consumption of fat.

Yes, it is undeniable that fat is very high in calories: one gram of fat releases twice as many calories as one gram of carbohydrates or proteins (9 kcal vs 4).

But, taken in the right amounts and of the right type, fat can quickly become one of your body’s allies.

Among the many benefits provided by fats, we can mention:

Vitamins A, D, E and K need fat to dissolve so they can be used by your body

to speak only of vitamin A, in addition to its well-known role for good eye health, it helps to regulate the famous metabolism mentioned above.

Dietary fat helps you keep a healthy skin (and hair)

and dry skin problems are one of the main symptoms mentioned by postmenopausal women.

and thus help in weight regulation.

Fat is critical for your brain to function properly

and therefore an ally in the face of menopause symptoms such as concentration or memory problems.

Dietary fat can help increase your muscle mass

and muscle mass is essential to fight against one of the proven risks of menopause, osteoporosis.

Certain types of fat are essential for a healthy heart and good blood circulation

and therefore help prevent cardiovascular disease, the main health risk for postmenopausal women.

In fact, it’s all a question of quantity and quality.

Quantity: it is recommended that 25-35% of the daily calorie intake be from fat. Quality: the different types of fats range from highly harmful (trans fats) to beneficial (unsaturated fats … in reasonable quantities).

Exploring these different types of fats deserves its own post: « Menopause: let’s not run away from (good) fat – part two ».

Are you interested in the experiences of women at different stages of their menopause? Would you like a reminder of the physiology of menopause and the main symptoms? Download our free ebook, Menopause Story(ies).

1: source : the Writing Group of the International Menopause Society for World Menopause Day 2012 (2012) « Understanding weight gain at menopause », Climacteric,  15:5,  419-429, DOI: 10.3109/13697137.2012.707385

Ménopause : ne fuyons pas le (bon) gras – première partie

Ménopause : ne fuyons pas le (bon) gras – première partie

La grande majorité des femmes considère que la ménopause s’accompagne d’une prise de poids.

Et de fait, la plupart des études scientifiques ont constaté une augmentation du poids chez la femme ménopausée (certaines études parlent d’une augmentation de 0,5 kg par an1), même s’il y a débat sur l’impact réel de la ménopause en tant que telle vs le ralentissement du métabolisme avec l’âge.

En tout état de cause, l’une des conséquences de cette perception est la tentation de « fuir » le gras sous toutes ses formes, ou du moins de limiter fortement sa consommation.

Or cette tentation, quasi instinctive, fait passer la femme ménopausée à côté des bienfaits indéniables d’une consommation « raisonnée » de matières grasses.

Oui, il est indéniable que le gras soit très calorique: un gramme de gras libère deux fois plus de calories qu’un gramme de glucides ou de protéines (9 kcal vs 4).

Mais, pris dans les bonnes quantités et sous la bonne forme, le gras peut vite devenir l‘un des alliés de votre organisme.

Parmi les nombreux bénéfices apportés par les matières grasses, on peut citer:

Les vitamines A, D, E et K sont liposolubles : elles ont besoin de matières grasses pour pouvoir être utilisées par l’organisme

pour ne parler que de la vitamine A, outre son rôle bien connu pour une bonne santé oculaire, elle contribue à réguler le fameux métabolisme évoqué ci-dessus.

Les matières grasses alimentaires contribuent au maintien d’une peau hydratée et de cheveux sains 

or les problèmes de peau sèche font partie des symptômes les plus souvent évoqués par les femmes ménopausées.

et ainsi aider à la régulation du poids.

Le gras est essentiel pour un bon fonctionnement du cerveau

et donc un allié face aux symptômes de la ménopause tels que les problèmes de concentration ou de mémoire.

Les matières grasses peuvent aider à augmenter votre masse musculaire

le maintien de la masse musculaire étant essentiel pour lutter contre l’un des risques avérés de la ménopause, l’ostéoporose.

Certaines matières grasses sont indispensables pour un bon fonctionnement cardiaque et une bonne circulation sanguine

et donc aident à prévenir les maladies cardiovasculaires, le principal risque pour la santé des femmes ménopausées.

En fait, tout est question de quantité et de qualité.

Quantité : il est recommandé que 25-35% de l’apport calorique quotidien soit issu de matières grasses.
Qualité : les différents types de gras vont du fortement nuisible (acide gras trans) au bénéfique (acides gras insaturés … en quantité raisonnable).

L’exploration de ces différents types mérite son propre article : « Ménopause : ne fuyons pas le (bon) gras – deuxième partie ».

Vous êtes intéressée par l’expérience vécue par des femmes à des stades différents de leur ménopause? Souhaitez un rappel de la physiologie de la ménopause et des principaux symptômes ? Téléchargez notre ebook gratuit, Histoire(s) de ménopause.

1: source : the Writing Group of the International Menopause Society for World Menopause Day 2012 (2012) « Understanding weight gain at menopause », Climacteric,  15:5,  419-429, DOI: 10.3109/13697137.2012.707385

Courts and tribunals: the end of menopause invisibility ?

Courts and tribunals: the end of menopause invisibility ?

When a reality such as menopause is perceived as taboo, women end up being subjected to a double penalty.

Not only do they experience overwhelmingly the inconvenience of symptoms affecting daily life, such as the famous hot flashes, but the associated taboo adds additional stress to social situations by limiting their ability to express what they are experiencing and implicitly intimating, to paraphrase Molière1, to « cover up this symptom that society can’t endure to look on. »

In 2020 French television broadcast a documentary by Joëlle Oosterlinck and Blandine Grosjean, « Ménopausées ». Author of the documentary, Blandine Grosjean said at the time: « I was inspired to make this documentary when a woman leader of the economic world, who had seen my previous film, Sex without consent, told me that there was another taboo that should to be approached, the menopause. What she had to live in secrecy, in shame, made her angry. And it touched me, alerted me. Yet when I contacted her again, she refused to testify.  »

How many are these women who have internalized this imperative of an invisible menopause?

So when on February 24 the UK Judicial College published its new edition of the Equal Treatment Bench Book (ETBB) where, for the first time, recommendations appeared for taking menopause symptoms into account, it was a real cause for celebration.

The ETBB offers guidance aimed at combating discrimination, it is intended not only for judges but for all judicial officers. It aims to promote awareness and understanding of the different circumstances of people appearing in courts and tribunals be it as parties, witnesses or jurors

The revised ETBB helps judges understand menopause and its impact on women, and offers a series of recommendations.

The ETBB reminds them that menopause often remains a taboo subject at work and that women who mention it often are met with embarrassment, ignorance, inappropriate humor or even hostility2.

It describes some of the most common symptoms (hot flashes, urinary problems, heavy periods, sleep disturbance, fatigue, headaches …) and recommends making sure that the room has working air conditioning or the possibility of opening the windows.

It also recommends ensuring easy access to toilet facilities and taking frequent breaks.

Finally, the ETBB recommends that judges be attentive to signs of discomfort, because women may suffer in silence, feeling too embarrassed to ask the court for adjustments to relieve their symptoms3.

Coming less than two weeks before International Women’s Day, this publication is a welcome and concrete step towards ending « menopause invisibility ».

Are you interested in the experiences of women at different stages of their menopause? Would you like a reminder of the physiology of menopause and the main symptoms? Download our free ebook, Menopause Story(ies).

1: see Tartuffe, Act III, Scene II
2: source: Equal Treatment Bench Book February 2021, p171.
3: source: ibid., p 172

Cour de justice: la fin de l’invisibilité de la ménopause?

Cour de justice: la fin de l’invisibilité de la ménopause?

Lorsqu’une réalité telle que la ménopause est perçue comme tabou, les femmes concernées sont soumises à une double peine.

Non seulement subissent-elles en grande majorité les désagréments de symptômes affectant la vie quotidienne, tels que les fameuses bouffées de chaleur, mais le tabou associé ajoute un stress supplémentaire aux situations sociales en limitant leur capacité à exprimer ce qu’elles vivent et en leur intimant implicitement, pour paraphraser Molière1, de « couvrir ce symptôme que la société ne saurait voir. »

En 2020 la télévision française diffusait un documentaire de Joëlle Oosterlinck et Blandine Grosjean, « Ménopausées ». Autrice du documentaire, Blandine Grosjean raconte : « J’ai eu envie de faire ce documentaire quand une dirigeante du monde économique, qui avait vu mon film précédent, Sexe sans consentement, m’a glissé qu’il y avait un autre tabou qui devrait être abordé, la ménopause. Ce qu’elle devait vivre en secret, dans la honte, la mettait en colère. Et cela m’a touchée, alertée. Pourtant, quand je l’ai re-contactée, elle a refusé de témoigner. »

Combien sont-elles, ces femmes qui ont internalisé cet impératif d’une ménopause invisible?

Alors, lorsque le 24 février dernier le Judicial College du Royaume-Uni publie sa nouvelle édition de l’ Equal Treatment Bench Book (ETBB) où, pour la première fois, apparaissent des recommandations pour la prise en compte des symptômes de la ménopause, c’est une véritable cause de célébration.

L’ETBB est un guide luttant contre les discriminations à destination non seulement des juges mais de l’ensemble des officiers de justice. Il vise à promouvoir la prise de conscience et la compréhension des circonstances propres aux individus comparaissant comme parties, témoins ou jurés.

La nouvelle version de l’ETBB aide les officiers de justice à comprendre la ménopause et ses impacts pour les femmes concernées, et offre une série de recommandations.

L’ETBB rappelle que la ménopause reste souvent un sujet tabou au travail et que les femmes qui l’évoquent doivent souvent faire face à des interlocuteurs mal à l’aise, de l’ignorance, de l’humour mal placé voire de l’hostilité2.

Il décrit quelques uns des symptômes les plus répandus (bouffées de chaleur, problèmes urinaires, règles abondantes, problèmes de sommeil, fatigue, maux de tête …) et recommande de s’assurer que la pièce soit équipée d’un système d’air conditionné en état de marche ou de la possibilité d’ouvrir les fenêtres.

Il recommande également de s’assurer que les personnes aient facilement accès aux toilettes et d’effectuer des pauses fréquentes.

Enfin l’ETBB recommande aux juges d’être attentifs aux signes d’inconfort, car la femme concernée peut souffrir en silence, se sentant trop embarrassée pour demander à la cour des ajustements pour soulager ses symptômes3.

Survenant moins de deux semaines avant la journée internationale de la femme, cette publication est un pas concret et bienvenu vers la fin d’une « ménopause invisible ».

Vous êtes intéressée par l’expérience vécue par des femmes à des stades différents de leur ménopause? Souhaitez un rappel de la physiologie de la ménopause et des principaux symptômes ? Téléchargez notre ebook gratuit, Histoire(s) de ménopause.

1: cf. Tartuffe Acte III, Scène 2
2: source: Equal Treatment Bench Book February 2021, p171.
3: source: ibid. , p 172

Bone mineral density: the tea card

Bone mineral density: the tea card

Osteoporosis, along with associated fractures, is one of the major health risks for postmenopausal women. Some studies estimate that more than half of women will suffer a fracture1 due to osteoporosis in the years following menopause.

Osteoporosis results in loss of bone mineral density (BMD) and qualitative deterioration of bone tissue.

However, according to several studies, the most popular beverage in the world, tea, has a positive effect on BMD. Its chemical components would help maintain a higher BMD level and reduce the risk of fractures1, especially in women.

The level of this positive effect varies but, for example, some studies speak of a BMD of the lumbar spine 10% higher in tea drinkers than in non-drinkers, and some of BMD of the femoral neck 14% higher among tea drinkers2.

But what kind of tea consumption are we talking about?

green tea, black tea, oolong?

A few studies1 find green tea to be more beneficial than others for BMD; but other studies have found that the type of tea does not make a difference3.

regular and longtime

Four or more times per week3, bearing in mind that there is a linear progression in BMD with the number of years of consumption4, and that starting to drink tea before entering menopause would be more effective than starting after menopause3.

moderate


One to five cups per day 4. It should be noted that excessive consumption (more than ten cups per day) not only would not provide any benefit for BMD, but would present serious health risks because of toxic concentrations of serum fluorides1.

Therefore, to make good old bones, each will do according to « her cup of tea »!

Are you interested in the experiences of women at different stages of their menopause? Would you like a reminder of the physiology of menopause and the main symptoms? Download our free ebook, Menopause Story(ies).

1: source « Green Tea and Bone Metabolism » Chwan-Li Shen, James K. Yeh, Jay Cao, and Jia-Sheng Wang – Nutr Res. 2009 July ; 29(7): 437–456. doi:10.1016/j.nutres.2009.06.008
2: ibid. Table 1
3: source « Drinking tea before menopause is associated with higher bone mineral density in postmenopausal women » Saili Ni, Lu Wang, Guowei Wang, Jie Lin, Yiyun Ma, Xueyin Zhao, Yuan Ru, Weifang Zheng, Xiaohui Zhang, Shankuan Zhu – European Journal of Clinical Nutritionhttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41430-021-00856-y
4: source « Oolong tea drinking boosts calcaneus bone mineral density in postmenopausal women: a population-based study in southern China ». Duan, P., Zhang, J., Chen, J. et al. – Arch Osteoporos 15, 49 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11657-020-00723-6

Densité minérale osseuse: l’atout thé

Densité minérale osseuse: l’atout thé

L’ostéoporose, avec les fractures associées, est l’un des risques santé majeurs pour les femmes ménopausées. Certaines études estiment que plus de la moitié des femmes subiront une fracture1 pour cause d’ostéoporose dans les années suivant l’entrée en ménopause.

L’ostéoporose se traduit par une perte de densité minérale osseuse (DMO) et une détérioration qualitative des tissus osseux.

Or, la boisson la plus consommée dans le monde, le thé, aurait selon plusieurs études un effet positif sur la DMO. Ses composants chimiques permettraient de maintenir un niveau de DMO supérieur à la moyenne et de réduire les risques de fracture1, en particulier chez les femmes.

La hauteur de cet effet positif varie mais, à titre d’exemple, certaines études parlent d’une DMO des lombaires de 10% supérieure chez les buveurs de thé à celle chez les non buveurs, ou encore d’une DMO du col du fémur de 14% supérieure chez les buveurs de thé2.

Mais de quel type de consommation de thé parle-t-on?

thé vert, noir, oolong?
Quelques études1 estiment que le thé vert est plus bénéfique que les autres pour la DMO ; mais d’autres ont trouvé que le type de thé ne fait pas de différence3.

régulière et sur la durée
Quatre fois ou plus par semaine3 , sachant qu’on observe une progression linéaire de la DMO avec le nombre d’années de consommation4, et que commencer à boire du thé avant l’entrée en ménopause serait plus efficace que commencer après la ménopause3.

modérée

Une à cinq tasses par jour4. Il est à noter qu’une consommation excessive (plus de dix tasses par jour) non seulement n’apporterait pas de bénéfices pour la DMO, mais présenterait des risques sérieux pour la santé via des concentrations toxiques de fluorures sériques1.

Conclusion, pour faire de bons et vieux os, chacune fera selon « sa tasse de thé » !

Vous êtes intéressée par l’expérience vécue par des femmes à des stades différents de leur ménopause? Souhaitez un rappel de la physiologie de la ménopause et des principaux symptômes ? Téléchargez notre ebook gratuit, Histoire(s) de ménopause.

1: source « Green Tea and Bone Metabolism » Chwan-Li Shen, James K. Yeh, Jay Cao, and Jia-Sheng Wang – Nutr Res. 2009 July ; 29(7): 437–456. doi:10.1016/j.nutres.2009.06.008
2: ibid. Table 1
3: source « Drinking tea before menopause is associated with higher bone mineral density in postmenopausal women » Saili Ni, Lu Wang, Guowei Wang, Jie Lin, Yiyun Ma, Xueyin Zhao, Yuan Ru, Weifang Zheng, Xiaohui Zhang, Shankuan Zhu – European Journal of Clinical Nutritionhttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41430-021-00856-y
4: source « Oolong tea drinking boosts calcaneus bone mineral density in postmenopausal women: a population-based study in southern China ». Duan, P., Zhang, J., Chen, J. et al. – Arch Osteoporos 15, 49 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11657-020-00723-6